51 Types of Green Gemstones for Jewelry

Green is an elegant color, and green stones in jewelry reflect a sophisticated taste in fashion. Green gems give your look that flashy yet organic glint, fancy as blue, but earthy as red and yellow. Do you know the different green gemstones? There is a great array of choices when it comes to green jewels, wider than any other color. Here is a list of the green rocks used in jewelry, from the most expensive to the more affordable.

Green Aventurine Bracelet
Bracelet of aventurine, a popular semiprecious stone representing the color green

Green Diamond

While pure diamonds are clear, various impurities give the precious stones different colors. Of the several varieties of diamonds, the green gems are less rare than red and black, but less common than yellow and white. The green precious stones are a result of irradiation of pure diamonds. Diamond in general is the traditional and modern birthstone for the month of April, both in the Western and Hindu calendar.

Green Diamond
A cut green diamond
Source: Chris 73 / Wikimedia Commons

Green Jadeite

Jadeite is the most expensive variety of jade stones, and is most popularly known to occur as green stones of various shades, the most valuable being the translucent and intensely green gemstones. Just like the chemically unrelated variety of jade, nephrite, jadeite is also available in white. See also Jade: Stone of Fortune.

Green Jadeite
A piece of raw jadeite
Source: Ra’ike via Wikimedia Commons
Emerald
Green crystal of emerald on the rock
Source: Eva Kröcher, CC-BY-SA, via Wikimedia Commons

Emerald

Exclusively green stones, emeralds are part of a group of minerals called beryl, which is also available in yellow, black and red. The name emerald comes from the Greek smaragdos, which literally means “green gem.” The precious green stones are prone to inclusions, as well as surface fissures. Perfectly smooth and transparent pieces of the green precious stones, which are very hard to come by, are indeed quite valuable. The green gemstones are the traditional and modern birthstone for the month of May, both in the Western and Hindu calendar, as well as the birthstone for the zodiac sign Cancer.

Alexandrite
The same faceted piece of alexandrite changing color from green to pink
Source: Alfonso via Wikimedia Commons

Alexandrite

Alexandrite is a color-changing variety of chrysoberyl. Different varieties of alexandrite produce different colors. Alexandrite from Russia consists of green gemstones that at night, under incandescent light, shift to red in color. Other varieties of alexandrite may give off yellow or pink during the day. Along with pearl and moonstone, alexandrite is the modern birthstone for the month of June in the US.

Green Garnet
A gorgeous green variety of garnet
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Garnet

Beside red, yellow and black, garnets also occur as green stones. The green gemstones come from three different garnet species. The andradite species is further divided into the varieties topazolite and demantoid, which is the most expensive of garnets. Grossular garnet also produces green rocks, while uvarovite, one of the rarest garnet species, are beautiful and consistently green gems. Color-changing varieties of garnet also exist. Garnet is general is the traditional and modern birthstone for the month of January in the Western calendar, as well as the zodiac sign Aquarius.

Green Tourmaline
A green tourmaline crystal
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Tourmaline

Beside black, red (rubellites) and yellow, tourmalines also occur as green stones. The green gemstones come the species of tourmaline called elbaite, which is further divided into two varieties: verdelite and indicolite, the latter also available in blue. Both green gemstones are sourced from Brazil, from which a newly discovered, brightly colored indicolite called Paraiba tourmaline has risen to popularity, and is the most expensive of the green rocks. Another highly valuable variety of the green jewels is chrome tourmaline, which is richly green due to the presence of chromium. A tourmaline that is green on one end and pink on the other is called watermelon tourmaline.

Green Serendibite

Serendibite is an extremely rare gemstone, much more so the green stones, which were the only serendibite known in existence until 2005, when the black variety was discovered. The green gems are attractively bright and transparent. The name serendibite comes from Serendib, the old Arabic name for Sri Lanka, from which the precious green gemstones were solely found.

Green Opal
Green opal on a necklace
Source: Opalcutters23 via Wikimedia Commons

Green Opal

Beside white, black, red and yellow, precious opal also occurs as green stones, or white/black stones that display a play of color involving green. Green fire against white background is the most common of the precious opals; green against black body tone is much more valuable. Most of the green gems come from Australia. The green gemstones are also found in Peru. Another variety of opal named hyalite also produces green rocks.

Green Spinel

Beside red, black, yellow and white, spinels also occur as green stones. Glassy to dull in luster, the green gems are gray or dark in intensity, and indeed not very suitable for jewelry. Like yellow spinels, the green gemstones are also quite rare, and hence only mostly availed of as collector’s pieces.

Green Sphene
Green crystals of sphene
Source: Carles Millan via Wikimedia Commons

Green Sphene

Also called titanite for its titanium content, sphene is a stone with brilliance that can exceed diamond, though of far lower hardness compared to the latter. Beside yellow and red, sphene also occurs as green gemstones, usually with yellow undertone. The green stones are very rare, and accordingly more expensive.

Green Sapphire
Bluish green crystal of sapphire
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Sapphire

Sapphires belong to a group of minerals called corundum along with ruby, or the red sapphire. While commonly thought of as blue in color, sapphires also occur as black, yellow and green gemstones. Beautiful though they are, the green precious stones are less commonly used in jewelry compared to the other colors of sapphire. Sapphire in general is the modern birthstone for the month of September in the Western calendar, and the month of July in the Hindu calendar, while traditionally identified as the birthstone for the zodiac sign Taurus.

Chrysoberyl
Green crystal of chrysoberyl
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Chrysoberyl

While popularly known for its yellow variety, which is called cymophane or cat’s eye, as well as its color-changing cousin, alexandrite, chrysoberyl occurs most commonly as yellowish green stones, which may be transparent to translucent in clarity. The green gems used to be called by the name chrysolite, which confused the green gemstones with peridot.

Green Zircon
Yellowish green crystal of zircon
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Zircon

Zircons are popular substitutes to diamonds. Beside red, yellow and black, zircons also occur as green stones. While excellent in terms of gem quality, the green gems are abundantly found in the earth’s crust; hence the relative inexpensiveness of the green gemstones compared to other stones.

Green Smithsonite
Green crystal of smithsonite
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Smithsonite

Smithsonite, also known as zinc spar, is an ore of zinc, like sphalerite. Beside white, yellow and blue, smithsonite also occurs as green stones. The green gems are translucent to opaque. The green gemstones were named after the mineralogist James Smithson, who first identified the mineral in 1802.

Green Andalusite
A green crystal of andalusite
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Andalusite

Andalusite is an aluminum-bearing mineral that was named after the province of Andalusia in Spain, where the stone was first discovered. Beside yellow and red, andalusite occurs as green stones, though the same green gemstones may not be always green. Like alexandrite, the green gems changes color from green to red, or yellow.

Labradorite
A fine specimen of labradorite
Source: Stowarzyszenie Spirifer via Wikimedia Commons

Green Labradorite and Andesine

Labradorite is feldspar mineral like sunstone and oligoclase, as well as moonstone and orthoclase. Beside blue and yellow, labradorite also occurs as green stones. The green gemstones produce an iridescent play of colors called labradorescence. A close cousin of labradorite that varies only slightly in terms of chemical composition is andesine, which also occurs as green gems.

Peridot Bracelet
Peridot Bracelet

Peridot

Peridot is a gemstone from the mineral olivine. Like citrine, peridot is one of the very few gemstones that have only one color: green, though shades of the green gemstones range from olive green, to brownish, to almost yellow — all with glassy luster. Peridot is the modern birthstone for the month of August in the Western calendar.

Green Idocrase
Green crystals of idocrase or vesuvianite
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Idocrase

Idocrase is gem quality vesuvianite, a mineral first discovered and named after the Mount Vesuvius. Beside yellow and blue, idocrase also occurs as green stones. The green gems are transparent to translucent in clarity. The green gemstones come from California, USA, and Pakistan.

Green Pearls
Green Tahitian pearls
Source: Rémi Jouan via Wikimedia Commons

Green Pearl

Though popularly known for their white variety, pearls are also available as black, yellow and green stones. Light green pearls are produced by Japan’s Akoya oysters, while the dark green gemstones come from the black pearl oyster, whose pearls are not necessarily black, but may also be shades of green and blue. Pearl is the modern birthstone for the month of June in the US.

Green Bowenite
Green bowenite up close
Source: Gregory Phillips via Wikimedia Commons

Green Bowenite

Though also found in yellow, bowenite are mainly green stones from the serpentine mineral antigonite, which is an otherwise soft rock. The green gems range in color from dark green to olive green. The green rocks are opaque to translucent, the latter being rare and accordingly expensive. The green gemstones are sometimes sold as jade.

Green Sphalerite
Olive green crystals of sphalerite
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Sphalerite

Sphalerite is the main ore of zinc. Beside yellow, red and black, sphalerite also occurs as green stones. The green gems are rather soft, and therefore best left unset as collector’s pieces; though there are people who choose to wear the green gemstones in jewelry. The green rocks are found in Bulgaria.

Green Kornerupine

Kornerupine is a rare gemstone first discovered in 1884 in Greenland. Translucent kornerupine makes fine gems, of which the green stones are more valuable than their yellow counterpart. Like cymophane, the green gemstones are also known to produce a cat’s eye effect.

Green Apatite
Light green crystals of apatite
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Apatite

While commonly used to make fertilizer, apatite is a phosphate mineral that produces rocks of gem quality, usually occurring as green crystals, though yellow and blue are also available. The green gems may exhibit chatoyancy or iridescent luster like cat’s eye. The transparent green gemstones of the apatite mineral are called asparagus stone.

Chrome Diopside
Brilliantly green crystal of chrome diopside
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Chrome Diopside

Like black star diopside, chrome diopside is gem quality diopside. Chrome diopside occurs as green stones, the rich color being caused by chromium inclusion. The green gems have a glassy to dull luster. The green gemstones are found in a number of localities, including North America, South Africa, Russia and Brazil.

Enstatite
Green enstatite crystal
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Enstatite

Enstatite is a magnesium-rich mineral. Beside yellow and white, enstatite occurs as green crystals, in which color it is known as chrome enstatite. Like cymophane, the green semi-precious stones can also produce a cat’s eye effect. A close cousin of enstatite, hypersthene, better known as orthopyroxene, likewise occurs as green stones, used in jewelry as well.

Green Sunstone
Cut green sunstone beside orange and red

Green Sunstone

Sunstone belongs to the feldspar group of minerals, along with oligoclase, labradorite and andesine, as well as moonstone and orthoclase. Beside red, yellow and blue, sunstones also occur as green crystals. The glassy green semi-precious stones are clear on the edges, with the color concentrated at the center of the green gemstones. The green stones are found in the US State of Oregon and Norway.

Hiddenite
Green crystals of hiddenite
Source: Parent Géry via Wikimedia Commons

Hiddenite

A variety of spodumene, hiddenite occurs as pale green crystals, first discovered in North Carolina, USA. The color of the green semi-precious stones comes from the intrusion of chromium. There exist other green gemstones of the spodumene mineral not colored by chromium, and therefore not considered true hiddenite.

Moldavite
The strange, alien green crystals of moldavite
Source: H. Raab via Wikimedia Commons

Green Moldavite

Moldavite consists, in a manner of speaking, of alien green crystals, coming from outer space. The semi-precious green stones are tektites, or debris from meteorites that had crashed on earth. While other tektites are black, moldavite is composed of light green gemstones that are translucent in clarity. Being a product of extraterrestrial activity, the green semiprecious stones are in quite limited supply, and may be very nearly exhausted from the ground.

Green Amber
A gorgeous specimen of green amber
Source: The Singularity via Wikimedia Commons

Green Amber

While commonly yellow, ambers also occur as green crystals, beside red and blue. The green gemstones are not strictly stones, but fossilized resin from evergreen trees preserved under high pressure. Unlike other gemstones, the semi-precious green stones are warm to the touch, though the green stones are not to be exposed to intense heat, with which they soften. The green semi-precious stones are more expensive when they have fossil inclusions.

Green Zoisite
Green crystal of zoisite
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Zoisite

Beside yellow, white and blue, zoisite also occurs as green crystals. The green semi-precious stones are translucent to transparent, with the latter used mostly in jewelry. The green gemstones may occur in association with ruby, in which case the semiprecious stone is called ruby-zoisite or anyolite.

Green Topaz
A green crystal of topaz
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Topaz

Beside yellow and red, topaz also occurs as green crystals. The green semi-precious stones are rather rare. The green gemstones do occur naturally in a number of localities, including Brazil, the United States, Sri Lanka and Myanmar. Colorless topaz may also be treated to make the green semiprecious stones.

Turquoise Necklace
Turquoise Necklace

Green Turquoise

While most popular in its light blue color, turquoise also occurs as green stones, though the shade still closely approaches blue. This green gemstone is rather rare, and is consequently among the most valuable of the opaque stones. Turquoise is the birthstone for December, and the zodiac sign Sagittarius.

Green Nephite
A dark green slab of nephrite
Source: Adam Ognisty via Wikimedia Commons

Green Nephrite

Beside white and yellow, nephrite also produces green rocks, although these green semi-precious stones are deemed inferior in quality compared to the chemically unrelated variety of jade, jadeite. Nephrites are translucent to opaque, with the shades of the green gemstones varying from light to dark green. See also Jade: Stone of Fortune.

Maw-sit-sit
A magnificent maw-sit-sit rock
Source: James St. John via Wikimedia Commons

Maw-sit-sit

Discovered only in 1963, Maw-sit-sit consists of green rocks with dark-green to black veins. The green semi-precious stones are composed of several minerals, including jadeite and albite feldspar, hence the other name of the green gemstones, jade-albite. The semiprecious green stones are exclusively found in Myanmar (Burma).

Green Agate Necklace
Green Agate Necklace

Green Agate

Agate is banded variety of chalcedony, which is a member of the quartz group of minerals. Several types of agate produce stones with green stripes. Agate is the traditional birthstone for the months of May and June in the Western calendar, as well as the zodiac sign Gemini. See also Agate: Stone of Prudence.

Moss Agate Necklace
Moss Agate Necklace

Moss Agate

While called an agate, moss agate is not strictly an agate, but a separate variety of chalcedony. This green gemstone is different in that moss agate lacks the concentric banding that characterizes agate. Moss agate is distinguished for its green inclusions, which resembles green moss against a body of milk or clear quartz. See also Moss Agate: Stone of Friendship.

Malachite
An incredible malachite formation
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Malachite

Malachite occurs as green rocks typically around copper deposits. Though very similar in composition to azurite, which is blue, malachite consists exclusively of green semi-precious stones, which only vary in shades from bright green, dark, to yellowish. The green gemstones are relatively soft, and hence not the best green gemstones for jewelry.

Green Fluorite
A green crystal of fluorite
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Fluorite

Fluorite, also known as fluorspar, is a brilliant mineral from which the word fluorescent was derived. Beside blue, yellow, red and black, fluorite also occur as green crystals. While beautiful, the green semi-precious stones are rather soft, hence not very suitable for jewelry, and accordingly inexpensive.

Prasiolite
A green crystal of prasiolite

Prasiolite

If yellow quartz is called citrine and violet quartz amethyst, green quartz is called prasiolite, also spelled praziolite. Like aventurine, prasiolite — also called vermarine or just green quartz — is a variety of quartz that occurs as green crystals. Natural specimens of the green semi-precious stones are rare, with small supply coming from Brazil, Poland and Canada. Most prasiolite sold in the market are treated amethyst.

Chrysoprase
A chrysoprase stone
Source: Ra’ike via Wikimedia Commons

Chrysoprase and Chrome Chalcedony

Chrysoprase, chrysophrase or chrysoprasus, is a variety of chalcedony, a group of quartz minerals which includes jasper, bloodstone, onyx, agate and carnelian. Chrysoprase occurs as green rocks that owe their bright color from nickel. Chalcedony may also be colored green with chromium, instead of nickel, but the green semi-precious stones would be called, not chrysoprase, but chrome chalcedony, which is found in Zimbabwe.

Green Aventurine Necklace
Green Aventurine Necklace

Green Aventurine

Aventurine is quartz like citrine, chalcedony and tiger’s eye, but is most commonly available as green gemstones, though yellow, white and blue are also available. The green semi-precious stones are translucent to opaque, and give off platy shimmer that is called aventurescence. Most of the semi-precious green stones come from India. See also Green Aventurine: Stone of Luck.

Green Moonstone
Green moonstone
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Moonstone

Moonstone is feldspar like orthoclase, as well as labradorite, andesine, sunstone and oligoclase. While best known for its opalescent white color, moonstone is also occurs as green gemstones, brown and black. The green semi-precious stones have a light hue, and almost the same opalescent luster as the white moonstones. Moonstone was traditionally the birthstone for the month of August, but was designated as the modern birthstone for June in the Western calendar.

Bloodstone
Pieces of bloodstone
Source: Blackoceanking via Wikimedia Commons

Bloodstone

Also called heliotrope, bloodstone is chalcedony like jasper, carnelian, onyx and agate. Bloodstones are green gemstones sprinkled with red intrusions, which may be red jasper. The green semi-precious stones were traditionally the birthstone for the months of March and December, and remain the modern birthstone for the March in the Western calendar. The green stones are likewise the birthstone of the zodiac sign Aries. See also Bloodstone: Stone of Freedom.

Green Prehnite
A green crystal of prehnite
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Green Prehnite

Beside yellow and white, prehnite also occurs as light green crystals. The green semi-precious stones are translucent, and only rarely transparent. First described in 1789, the green gemstones were the first mineral to be named after a person, Hendrik Von Prehn, a Dutch military commander.

Gaspeite
A bright green rock of gaspeite
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Gaspeite

Gaspeite consists of extremely rare green rocks that contain nickel. The green semi-precious stones are a bright green, almost like neon, and may be glassy to dull in luster. The green gemstones were named after the Gaspé Peninsula in Canada, where the green stones are found, beside Australia.

Picture Jasper Necklace
Green Picture Jasper Necklace

Green Jasper

While also found in red, yellow and black, jasper is most popularly known in ancient times as green gemstones, often compared with emerald. The green semi-precious stones were the traditional birthstone for the month of March along with bloodstone. The green stones are widely found on earth, and accordingly inexpensive.

Seraphinite
A seraphinite stone
Source: Ra’ike via Wikimedia Commons

Seraphinite

Seraphinite consists of green rocks that are distinguished for the resemblance of their groves to feathers. The green semi-precious stones have chatoyancy, or iridescent luster. The hardness of the green gemstones are very low, however, making the green stones relatively unsuitable for jewelry.

Variscite
A huge green rock of variscite
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Variscite

Variscite is phosphate mineral, like apatite, that occurs as green rocks. The green semi-precious stones are sometimes confused with turquoise, which is blue. The two semiprecious stones are at times marketed under one trade name: variquoise. The green gemstones are relatively rare, with supply coming from the US, Poland, Australia and Germany, where a region called Variscia gave the green stones their name.

Amazonite
A green rock of amazonite
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Amazonite

Feldspar like labradorite, andesine, sunstone and oligoclase, as well as orthoclase and moonstone, amazonite occurs as green rocks. The green semi-precious stones were named after the Amazon River, from which early specimens were supposedly obtained. The green gemstones are rare, with limited supply coming from Russia, the US, Madagascar and Brazil. The green stones fracture easily, however.

Chrysocolla
An exquisite green rock of chrysocolla
Source: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Chrysocolla

Chrysocolla is a copper ore, like cuprite and chalcopyrite, that occurs as blue and green rocks. The green semi-precious stones display a rich brilliance, which may be striped with white. Like other copper ore, however, the green gemstones have low hardness, and hence not the most suitable for jewelry.

Unakite
Green pebbles of unakite
Source: Tom Harpel via Wikimedia Commons

Unakite

Unakite is a rock composed of pink orthoclase, epidote and clear quartz. Consisting of green gemstones sprinkled with pink spots, unakite has a rather mottled look. Where the pink orthoclase is absent from the green semi-precious stones, the mineral is simply called epidosite.

Fuchsite
A green rock of fuchsite
Source: Navien via Wikimedia Commons

Fuchsite and Maripolite

Fuchsite and maripolite are varieties of muscovite, a mineral which has very low hardness. Due to their chromium content, both fuchsite and maripolite are available as green gemstones. Mariposite may have large quartz intrusion, giving them a more brilliant luster, and these green semi-precious stones are sometimes sold under the trade name emerald quartz. A variety of fuchsite from South Africa is called verdite.

Other Green Stones

Besides the green gemstones in the list above and the other, more precious green stones, there are still other green stones that exist, including fluorapophyllite, pargasite and ludlamite. These green rocks, however, have very limited use in jewelry, and are only mostly availed of as raw green crystals.

Do you like to wear green jewels for your personal ornaments? Green gems make great jewelry for a stylish look.

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Featured image credit: Cut emerald by Mauro Cateb via Wikimedia Commons

Last updated April 8, 2017
Deomar Pandan

About the Author

A jeweler and online writer, Deomar Pandan loves nature and the arts. He likes to delve into world religions, and has known astrology for over 10 years. Follow him now, and get revealing updates about your gemstones and zodiac sign.